erynn: Gaelic merman image (Music by Leonardo)
It's been a busy past couple of days. Today I had several folks over for bad movie night for Melody's birthday. We had a potluck, two Dr Phibes movies, and Mars Attacks. Food was tasty, much fun was had by all.

Saturday night was the Abney Park show down at Studio Seven. They had two opening bands and some aerialists. More stuff under the cut )
erynn: Gaelic merman image (lotus)
Today was threatening rain when [livejournal.com profile] fififolle swooped me off to Maryport, where we went to the Senhouse Roman Museum. For a tiny place, it packed in a lot of stuff. It has, apparently, the largest collection of Roman altars in Britain (23-ish?), mostly to Jupiter, but also to Mars, Aesculapius, and Minerva, among others. There were two Epona figures there, a horned god (I couldn't actually make out the figure clearly, I'm taking the museum's word for it), and the famous snake-stone pillar, with the snake climbing up one side and a face on the other. I took a bunch of photos. The site is some miles from Hadrian's Wall, but is a part of the general area's fortifications, and there was a rather badly done statue of Hadrianus Augustus in the recreation of the shrine of the standards, but one must photograph it anyway. ;) It was something with at least a tenuous connection to my Antinoan devotions.

There is an active dig going on through to the end of August, and they were giving tours, but we were there about noon, and the tour wasn't until 2pm. We decided to head down into Maryport and grabbed some lunch at the cafe in the aquarium (we didn't go into the aquarium itself). By the time 2pm had rolled around, the wind had picked up and it was raining. I wasn't really feeling that well anyway and didn't think my legs would hold up for it - I've been cramping pretty badly all day and had a lot of trouble moving most of the afternoon and into the evening. I was just as glad to let it go.

Upon our return to Chez Fi, I checked the weight on my backpack - just a hair under 20 pounds, so I have a little breathing room for my flight from Manchester to Rennes. We looked around at possibilities for things to do tomorrow, given my trip out to Penrith, and it turns out that the Long Meg circle is about 15 minutes or so out of town, so we may be able to visit that. It's outside of town on the other side of Penrith, but Fi seems willing to haul me out there. I don't think she's been there before. This is a fairly famous circle, and the third largest in Britain, so if I do get to go, that'll be a really nice finish to my tour of English sacred sites.

This evening we packed my hiking poles into a spare shipping tube and duct taped them like crazy. We'll stop by the post office on our way out so that I can ship them off home. They're very light, so the postage shouldn't be too much.

I wasn't really able to do more than a quiet meditation for Lughnassadh, but if rain is the presence of Lugh, then I certainly had him in spades today. We give what we are able, when it comes to time and physical capacity, and I was not up to very much today at all. I would have liked to do more, but perhaps I can do a little something tomorrow when I get into the B&B in Penrith and have some time alone before I see if Stephen will be available. Certainly, if I can spend a little time meditating at Long Meg without getting soaked, that would be a nice touch.

Tonight at dinner, I tried a Stella Artois pear cider, which was very nice. Last night, along with the Kopparberg, we'd tried a Bulmer's pear, which was really bland. I wasn't impressed at all, but I wouldn't mind having this one again. I wasn't nearly as jazzed as I was about the elderflower and lime, but it was still a good, solid cider with a nice flavor. If I can get pear, it's a little easier on my system than the apple, which can be a bit problematic if my system isn't quite up to dealing with it. Cider is usually reasonably safe, as apples go, but there are days when one really doesn't want to take any chances.

Being just a touch headachey, I'm about to drop myself into bed. I hope the weather in Brittany is better than this. I don't mind a little rain, but it's been downright dismal for much of my Isle of Man/Britain visit. I'm delighted I've had such good company to spend the time with, though! (Thank you, Fi! You and Neil have been wonderful.)
erynn: Gaelic merman image (lotus)
Today was threatening rain when [livejournal.com profile] fififolle swooped me off to Maryport, where we went to the Senhouse Roman Museum. For a tiny place, it packed in a lot of stuff. It has, apparently, the largest collection of Roman altars in Britain (23-ish?), mostly to Jupiter, but also to Mars, Aesculapius, and Minerva, among others. There were two Epona figures there, a horned god (I couldn't actually make out the figure clearly, I'm taking the museum's word for it), and the famous snake-stone pillar, with the snake climbing up one side and a face on the other. I took a bunch of photos. The site is some miles from Hadrian's Wall, but is a part of the general area's fortifications, and there was a rather badly done statue of Hadrianus Augustus in the recreation of the shrine of the standards, but one must photograph it anyway. ;) It was something with at least a tenuous connection to my Antinoan devotions.

There is an active dig going on through to the end of August, and they were giving tours, but we were there about noon, and the tour wasn't until 2pm. We decided to head down into Maryport and grabbed some lunch at the cafe in the aquarium (we didn't go into the aquarium itself). By the time 2pm had rolled around, the wind had picked up and it was raining. I wasn't really feeling that well anyway and didn't think my legs would hold up for it - I've been cramping pretty badly all day and had a lot of trouble moving most of the afternoon and into the evening. I was just as glad to let it go.

Upon our return to Chez Fi, I checked the weight on my backpack - just a hair under 20 pounds, so I have a little breathing room for my flight from Manchester to Rennes. We looked around at possibilities for things to do tomorrow, given my trip out to Penrith, and it turns out that the Long Meg circle is about 15 minutes or so out of town, so we may be able to visit that. It's outside of town on the other side of Penrith, but Fi seems willing to haul me out there. I don't think she's been there before. This is a fairly famous circle, and the third largest in Britain, so if I do get to go, that'll be a really nice finish to my tour of English sacred sites.

This evening we packed my hiking poles into a spare shipping tube and duct taped them like crazy. We'll stop by the post office on our way out so that I can ship them off home. They're very light, so the postage shouldn't be too much.

I wasn't really able to do more than a quiet meditation for Lughnassadh, but if rain is the presence of Lugh, then I certainly had him in spades today. We give what we are able, when it comes to time and physical capacity, and I was not up to very much today at all. I would have liked to do more, but perhaps I can do a little something tomorrow when I get into the B&B in Penrith and have some time alone before I see if Stephen will be available. Certainly, if I can spend a little time meditating at Long Meg without getting soaked, that would be a nice touch.

Tonight at dinner, I tried a Stella Artois pear cider, which was very nice. Last night, along with the Kopparberg, we'd tried a Bulmer's pear, which was really bland. I wasn't impressed at all, but I wouldn't mind having this one again. I wasn't nearly as jazzed as I was about the elderflower and lime, but it was still a good, solid cider with a nice flavor. If I can get pear, it's a little easier on my system than the apple, which can be a bit problematic if my system isn't quite up to dealing with it. Cider is usually reasonably safe, as apples go, but there are days when one really doesn't want to take any chances.

Being just a touch headachey, I'm about to drop myself into bed. I hope the weather in Brittany is better than this. I don't mind a little rain, but it's been downright dismal for much of my Isle of Man/Britain visit. I'm delighted I've had such good company to spend the time with, though! (Thank you, Fi! You and Neil have been wonderful.)
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Writy enochian keyboard)
http://preternature.org/index.php/PN/announcement/view/8

PRETERNATURE VOLUME 3:2 OLD GODS AND ANCIENT ONES

Call them pagan or ancient, earth-based or demonic, or by names like Hekate, Isis, Poseidon, Ereshkigal, Loki, and Anath, the Old Gods have been topics of energetic scholarly discussion, literary recreation, and artistic depiction for decades. As supplanted as they might seem to historians, the Old Gods live on and capture our imagination. Contextualized in archaeological study, sensationalized by filmmakers, and rendered in new costumes and flesh by artists, Old Gods continue, components of the flexible mythologies that make up shared cultural references. They are used across literature, graphic novels, television series, cinema, and MMORPGs to tell and enact narratives. As they had in ancient landscapes, the Old Gods now make up part of a dynamic belief systems and figure in new forms of ritual invocations.

This issue of Preternature especially welcomes scholars whose work focuses on the new uses of ancient Asian, Babylonian, Canaanite, Egyptian, Greek, Mesoamerican, Norse, and Slavic Gods. It also welcomes contributions, from any discipline, that highlight the cultural, literary, dramatic, religious, magical, or historical significance of any of the ancient gods in their own contexts, as a part of "paganisms," and as a part of contemporary popular cultures. We welcome synthetic overviews of Sarapis veneration in Ephesus or the cult of Mithras as much as feminist critiques of representations of goddesses in graphic novels. Analyses of new ritualizations of Old Gods in specific neopaganism groups are welcome as well. Ultimately, we are interested in how the ancient gods are maintained, in various media and in scholarly discussion, in this modern era.

Contributions should be roughly 8,000 - 12,000 words, including all documentation and critical apparatus, and adhere to the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition (style 1, employing endnotes). Contributions must be submitted through the Preternature CMS. Final submissions are due March 31, 2013.

Queries about journal scope and submissions can be made to the Editor, Dr. Kirsten C. Uszkalo . Queries concerning books to be reviewed can be made to the Book Reviews Editor, Dr. Richard Raiswell.

Preternature is a bi-annual publication, published through Penn State Press, and available in print or electronically through JSTOR, Project Muse, and as a Kindle e- book.

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