erynn: Gaelic merman image (writy medievalist)
Call for Papers: Plymouth State Medieval and Renaissance Forum
Plymouth, NH April 25-26, 2014
Session: Inscribing Monstrosity: Authors, Scribes and MSS
Sponsor: MEARCSTAPA
Organizer: Lisa LeBlanc


Monstrosity was used in the Middle Ages to represent difference, physical, mental, moral. It was often used to separate those on the outskirts of society (or from other societies altogether) from those considered in the mainstream. At times, however, authors depicted themselves as monstrous. This session will look at authors and narrators who depict monstrosity to reflect their own view of their place in society. Such monstrosity may be due to such things as moral failings, ethnic hybridity, gender, or other characteristics that cause one to see oneself as an outsider. The session will consider works from the early medieval period through the Renaissance. Questions to consider can include:

How are authorship, artistry, and audience united via monstrosity?
Must the author/artist "monster” him/herself in order to communicate monstrous material, and
must the audience do the same?
How do these transformations, which take place in conjunction with but nevertheless outside
the piece itself affect the relationship between the creator and the consumer?
Can one read/view/create the monstrous through one's own eyes, or must the means of the
communication of the aesthetic be "monstered?"


Abstracts of 250 words should be sent to Dr. Lisa LeBlanc
lleblanc@annamaria.edu
Deadline is Jan. 1, 2014
Please include your name, title and affiliation
Proposals not included in the session will be forwarded to the general proposal pool for consideration in other sessions.
_______________________________________________
mearcstapa mailing list
mearcstapa@lists.csuchico.edu
https://lists.csuchico.edu/mailman/listinfo/mearcstapa
erynn: Gaelic merman image (writy Watson)
Bi Men’s Anthology: Call for Writing and Artwork!

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO JUNE 30!

Due to the inspiring response to our original call and the impressive quality of the submissions we’ve received, we have decided to expand the vision of the anthology to include an e-book and print book, and to include a subset of selections online on the Good Men Project Magazine. We are therefore also extending the call for submissions and inviting additional work for inclusion in the anthology. If you identify as a bisexual (or anthrosexual/ambisexual/fluid/no labels/multisexual/omnisexual/pansexual/pomosexual/polysexual or in some other way as non-monosexual) man/male-identified person, we hope you will consider submitting your work.

You are welcome to submit essays, fiction, images, cartoons, poetry, or any combination of these. Suggested length for submissions is 500-2500 words.

You can submit work about anything you want, as long as it is somehow related to bisexual identity, practice, and/or experience. Suggested topics include:


Why and how you identify sexually;
Where you find support and/or community;
How your experience of sexual identity is shaped by your other identities (race/skin color, ethnicity, class, geography, religion, age, gender identity, etc.);
Stories about falling in (or out of) love or about relationships;
When and how you came out to yourself;
When and how you choose to come out to others;
Being a bi-identified man in different communities (e.g., heterosexual, SGLBTQI, kink, polyamorous, ethnic, religious, professional, cultural, etc.);
Racism, sexism, homonormativity or heteronormativity in bisexual spaces;
Marriage and marriage equity;
Being a father and managing family life;
Brotherhood and building men’s communities;
Organizing for social justice;
Ecological consciousness and sexuality;
Postcolonial queer identity;
Envisioning queer futures;
Mothers/Fathers and their bi sons;
HIV/AIDS, prostate/testicular cancer, or other health challenges;
Healthy living;
Media images of bisexual men (general or pornographic)
Being bi and out in gay organizations;
Bi men as elders and mentors.

We are also hoping to include a few resource lists. If you are interested in working on one of these, please let us know right away. Some ideas: bi men’s fiction, bi men’s nonfiction, bi men’s website; websites (bi or not) of particular interest to bi men.

We intend for the final project include a diverse range of voices and perspectives. Submissions from the Global South and people of color communities within North American and Europe are strongly encouraged. We are very much interested in the voices of young people, transgender men, and men living in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Indigenous/Aboriginal communities. If you feel that you rarely see people like yourself represented, please consider submitting work for the anthology.

Submissions are due by June 30, but it would be very helpful to get a sense now of your intentions.

The editors for this publication are Robyn Ochs, an educator, speaker, award-winning activist, and editor of the 42-country anthology, Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals Around the World and the Bi Women newsletter, and Dr. Herukhuti, sexologist, shaman, cultural worker, founder of Black Funk: The Center for Culture, Sexuality, and Spirituality and co-editor of Sexuality, Religion and the Sacred: Bisexual, Pansexual and Polysexual Perspectives.

Please write to us at bimen2013@gmail.com.

Thank you,
Robyn Ochs and Dr. Herukhuti
erynn: Gaelic merman image (get pagan sinfest)
Lady of Ten Thousand Lakes: Finding Wisdom in Places
Call for Papers

The Association for the Study of Women and Mythology Biennial Symposium
St. Paul, MN, April 20, 2013

Much of mythology is grounded in place. Suggested topics for this symposium might include, but are not limited to, the following:

How do and should the scholarship in Goddess Studies and Women's Mythology and Spirituality engage with the sense and reality of place? What women's myths are especially grounded in a place or places? What happens when such disciplines as Natural History, Ecology, and other sciences of place interact with Women and Mythology?

What does place mean methodologically? How does our scholarship change when place becomes an element or partner in our research? How does this intersect with Embodied Research or Embodied Methodologies? What are the criteria for solid scholarship using these new models?

Do issues of place add an activist quality to our scholarship? Does activism have a place in scholarship? What does it mean to find wisdom in places?

Proposals for papers, panels, and workshops addressing these topics will be given preference, but other subjects will be considered. Papers should be 20 minutes; panels with up to four papers on a related topic may be proposed together. Workshop proposals should be organized to provide audience interaction and must clearly address the theme. (Workshops are limited to 90 minutes.)

Presenters from all disciplines are welcome, as well as creative artists and practitioners who engage mythic themes in a scholarly manner in their work. Presenters must become members of ASWM prior to conference.

Send 250-word abstract (for panels, 200 word abstract plus up to 150 words per paper) to aswmsubmissions@gmail.com by February 2, 2013. Include bio of up to 70 words for each presenter, as well as contact information including surface address and email. See www.womenandmyth.org.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Ogma)
Cherry Hill Seminary and the University of South Carolina are proud to jointly sponsor a symposium on April 13-14, 2013, on the USC campus in Columbia, South Carolina.

Sacred Lands and Spiritual Landscapes: Cosmography of the Pagan Soul
Keynote Speaker: Ronald Hutton

We welcome papers that explore the following questions:
In today's post-modern, urbanized world, where everything is a commodity, how and where do Pagans find their sacred places? How should we protect and maintain these sites? In colonized worlds, how do we avoid the appropriation of these lands? If Goddess is immanent in nature, what makes some places more sacred than others? How is our spirituality shaped by the land and our relationship with the land shaped by our spirituality?

Proposals of up to 1000 words are due by January 1, 2013 and may be uploaded at http://www.cherryhillseminary.org/blog/announcements/call-for-papers/
erynn: Gaelic merman image (writy typewriter keyboard)
Bi Women Newsletter -- A call for submissions:

Says Robyn Ochs, Activist, Writer & Speaker (and editor in chief of Bi Women's Newsletter) The theme of the next issue of Bi Women will be "Mixed Marriages."

All relationships are arguably mixed marriages. Few of us have a partner with whom we share all aspects of identity: sex, gender, race or ethnicity, age, family background, religion, economic status, politics, interests, goals. What's your situation? How do you navigate differences in your relationships? How do differences augment and/ or challenge your relationship?

We want to hear from you. Essays, poems, artwork and short stories are welcome. Let me know right away if you're planning on writing. And send your submissions by November 1st to biwomeneditor@gmail.com.

Please signal boost by cross-posting this far and wide.

http://biwomenboston.org/
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Mercurius from Harmonia Macrocosmica)
CULTURE AND COSMOS
University of Wales Trinity Saint David

CALL FOR PAPERS
www.cultureandcosmos.org

Vol. 17 no 1: Literature and the Stars

We are inviting submissions for Vol. 17 no 1 (Spring/Summer 2013) on Literature and the Stars. Papers may focus on any time period or culture, and should deal either with representations of astronomy or astrology in fiction, or studies of astronomical or astrological texts as literature. Contributions may focus on western or non-western culture, and on the ancient, medieval or modern worlds.

Papers should be submitted by NOVEMBER 15, 2012. They should typically not exceed 8000 words length and should be submitted to editors@cultureandcosmos.org. Shorter submissions and research notes are welcome.

Contributors should follow the style guide athttp://www.cultureandcosmos.org/submissions.html

Please include an abstract of c. 100-200 words.

All submissions will peer-reviewed for originality, timeliness, relevance, and readability. Authors will be notified as soon as possible of the acceptability of their submissions.

Culture and Cosmos is published in association with the Sophia Centre for the Study of Cosmology in Culture, School of Archaeology, History and Anthropology, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Lampeter, Ceredigion, Wales, SA48 7ED, UK.
http://www.trinitysaintdavid.ac.uk/en/sophia/

As from Vol. 17 no 1 Culture and Cosmos will be published open-access, on-line, in the interests of open scholarship. Hard copy will be available via print-on-demand.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Cthulhu attacks!)
From the MEARCSTAPA list:

Call for Papers
Medieval Association of the Pacific Conference
University of San Diego, California
March 21-23, 2013
Sponsored by MEARCSTAPA (Monsters: the Experimental Association for the Research of Cryptozoology through Scholarly Theory And Practical Application)

Session Title: Heroes and Monsters

What is the relationship between the hero and the monster? How is the hero transformed by his/her encounter with the monstrous? What is the hero without the monster (and vice versa)? In an attempt to understand this association, our session invites papers on the relationship(s) between heroes and the monsters they defeat (or by whom they are defeated). We welcome papers addressing heroes and monsters in all of their various formats (heroes can include knights, saints, or those “just plain clever”; while monsters can be dragons, demons, giants, etc), and which choose to play figuratively upon the concept of defeat (e.g. the giant Galehaut’s “defeat” and death via lovesickness at the “hands” of Lancelot). Of particular interest will be those papers that focus upon the way in which the hero and/or monster is physically/mentally/spiritually changed through this encounter, or those works in which the hero is or becomes a monster (e.g. early versions of St. Christopher’s Life which feature him as a cynocephalus; the eponymous hero from Marie de France’s Bisclavret).

Please send a title, an abstract (approx. 350 words), and your complete contact information (Name, e-mail, telephone, affiliation, status, title) to Michael Heyes or Asa Simon Mittman by September 28. Please note that all abstract submissions will be posted on our blog: http://mearcstapa.org/wp/
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Cthulhu attacks!)
From the MEARCSTAPA list:

Call for Papers
Medieval Association of the Pacific Conference
University of San Diego, California
March 21-23, 2013
Sponsored by MEARCSTAPA (Monsters: the Experimental Association for the Research of Cryptozoology through Scholarly Theory And Practical Application)

Session Title: Heroes and Monsters

What is the relationship between the hero and the monster? How is the hero transformed by his/her encounter with the monstrous? What is the hero without the monster (and vice versa)? In an attempt to understand this association, our session invites papers on the relationship(s) between heroes and the monsters they defeat (or by whom they are defeated). We welcome papers addressing heroes and monsters in all of their various formats (heroes can include knights, saints, or those “just plain clever”; while monsters can be dragons, demons, giants, etc), and which choose to play figuratively upon the concept of defeat (e.g. the giant Galehaut’s “defeat” and death via lovesickness at the “hands” of Lancelot). Of particular interest will be those papers that focus upon the way in which the hero and/or monster is physically/mentally/spiritually changed through this encounter, or those works in which the hero is or becomes a monster (e.g. early versions of St. Christopher’s Life which feature him as a cynocephalus; the eponymous hero from Marie de France’s Bisclavret).

Please send a title, an abstract (approx. 350 words), and your complete contact information (Name, e-mail, telephone, affiliation, status, title) to Michael Heyes or Asa Simon Mittman by September 28. Please note that all abstract submissions will be posted on our blog: http://mearcstapa.org/wp/
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Writy enochian keyboard)
http://preternature.org/index.php/PN/announcement/view/8

PRETERNATURE VOLUME 3:2 OLD GODS AND ANCIENT ONES

Call them pagan or ancient, earth-based or demonic, or by names like Hekate, Isis, Poseidon, Ereshkigal, Loki, and Anath, the Old Gods have been topics of energetic scholarly discussion, literary recreation, and artistic depiction for decades. As supplanted as they might seem to historians, the Old Gods live on and capture our imagination. Contextualized in archaeological study, sensationalized by filmmakers, and rendered in new costumes and flesh by artists, Old Gods continue, components of the flexible mythologies that make up shared cultural references. They are used across literature, graphic novels, television series, cinema, and MMORPGs to tell and enact narratives. As they had in ancient landscapes, the Old Gods now make up part of a dynamic belief systems and figure in new forms of ritual invocations.

This issue of Preternature especially welcomes scholars whose work focuses on the new uses of ancient Asian, Babylonian, Canaanite, Egyptian, Greek, Mesoamerican, Norse, and Slavic Gods. It also welcomes contributions, from any discipline, that highlight the cultural, literary, dramatic, religious, magical, or historical significance of any of the ancient gods in their own contexts, as a part of "paganisms," and as a part of contemporary popular cultures. We welcome synthetic overviews of Sarapis veneration in Ephesus or the cult of Mithras as much as feminist critiques of representations of goddesses in graphic novels. Analyses of new ritualizations of Old Gods in specific neopaganism groups are welcome as well. Ultimately, we are interested in how the ancient gods are maintained, in various media and in scholarly discussion, in this modern era.

Contributions should be roughly 8,000 - 12,000 words, including all documentation and critical apparatus, and adhere to the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition (style 1, employing endnotes). Contributions must be submitted through the Preternature CMS. Final submissions are due March 31, 2013.

Queries about journal scope and submissions can be made to the Editor, Dr. Kirsten C. Uszkalo . Queries concerning books to be reviewed can be made to the Book Reviews Editor, Dr. Richard Raiswell.

Preternature is a bi-annual publication, published through Penn State Press, and available in print or electronically through JSTOR, Project Muse, and as a Kindle e- book.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (all your books!)
From Neos Alexandria:

Call for submissions! We are interested in a wide variety of pieces, including (but not limited to) scholarly articles, short fiction, poetry, original translations of ancient texts, hymns, rituals, recipes, and artwork that pertains to Hera, her Roman counterpart Iuno (Juno), and her Etruscan counterpart Uni.

We strongly encourage those interested in submitting to explore the many facets of this complex goddess in their work, including but not limited to

– Hera as Queen of Heaven, and the meaning and responsibilities of that position – Hera as Queen of the Gods, and her relationships with other members of the pantheon – Hera as Goddess of Marriage – Hera as Goddess of Women – Hera as the wife of Zeus, and the dynamics of their relationship – Hera as daughter of Rhea and Kronos – a discussion of the relationships between Hera and her children Ares, Eileithyia, Hebe and Hephaestus, as well as Eris and Typhaon – a discussion of Hera's reaction to Zeus' affairs, and her relationships with his lovers (eg, Leto, Semele, Io, et cetera) – a discussion of Hera's relationship with Zeus' mortal and immortal offspring (eg, Apollon, Artemis, Herakles, et cetera) – compare/contrast Hera, Demeter, Leto and Maia as divine mothers – Hera as the matron Goddess of Argos and Samos – Hera as the Goddess of heroes such as Jason and Herakles – Hera as the Goddess of Cattle – Hera as she is portrayed in the Homeric Hymns – Hera as she is portrayed in The Iliad and The Odyssey – Iuno as she is portrayed in The Aeneid, Metamorphoses, and other Latin works – a discussion of the cow, bull, cuckoo, peacock, scorpion, poppy, and pomegranate as symbols of Hera – a discussion of the origins and meaning of the name Hera (and/or Iuno, and/or Uni) – Iuno as a member of the Capitoline Triad – a discussion of Iuno's various epithets, their meanings, and their implications (such as Lucina, Mater, Moneta, Regina, et cetera) – the cultic links between Iuno and the wives of various Roman emperors – compare/contrast the relationship between Hera and Herakles, and Iuno and Hercules – a discussion of the iuno and genius, and lares and penates

Syncretisms between Hera and other God/dess/es are acceptable so long as the author clearly demonstrates this syncretism; for instance, a discussion of the differences, similarities and overlap between Hera and Goddesses such as Isis, Hathor, Asherah, Tanit, and/or Frigga.

All works must be original, not public domain. No plagiarism. Previously published submissions are acceptable, provided the author retains all rights to the work. Authors retain all rights to the submission. Upon acceptance, the author will be sent a permission to publish form along with a request for a short biography to include in the anthology.

The editor reserves the right to make any minor changes in the case of grammar, spelling and formatting concerns. The editor also reserves the right to request modification of submissions and to reject submissions as necessary.

No monetary compensation will be provided. Proceeds from all sales will be divided between charitable donations in the name of the Hera, and production costs of future publications from Bibliotheca Alexandrina. All contributors will receive a coupon code which will allow them to purchase three copies of the anthology at cost.

Acceptable length is anywhere from 100-10,000 words, and the submissions period will run from 1 June 2012 – 31 November 2013, with the projected release date of January 2013: an auspicious occasion as it coincides with the celebration of the Theogamilia. Please send your submission either in the body of the email or as a .doc/.docx or plain text/RTF attachment (for Mac users) with "Hera Devotional" in the subject line to lykeiasl@yahoo.com. Any artwork submitted should be scanned in or created at 300 dpi and sent as a .jpg or .tif file.

Please remember to include a by-line in your email: your name as you would like it to appear in the book!

We thank you for your contribution towards making this devotional anthology a wonderful literary celebration in honor of the Goddess, the Queen of Gods and Men.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Feminist dialectic brings 'em)
About Iron Maidens: an E-Anthology

Iron Maidens is an e-anthology with a purpose. Two purposes actually.

This anthology was born to fill a gap in the speculative fiction reading experience. Far too often in fiction, especially speculative fiction, strong female characters have faced sexual abuse somewhere in in their past. Frequently it is their only motivation for their acts of heroism, valor, and general kick-ass attitude. While there is a place for tales of sexual violence – both to show how terrible it is and to show that survivors can be more than just people who were once victims – it is not the only thing that can spur women into adventure. Women are fully capable of holding their own within the worlds fantasy without having first been subjected to sexual violence. We would like to prove it with a collection of stories from many voices across the fantasy genre.

The second purpose is directly linked to the first. All sales of Iron Maidens will be donated to the organization SAFER: Students Active for Ending Rape. In their own words SAFER “empowers students to hold their universities accountable for having strong campus sexual assault policies and programming.” This student run, all-volunteer collective is active on many university campuses across the United States, offering a variety of resources to help students, facility, and parents work together to make our universities a safer place to learn. Their cause is admirable and their goal is one we should aspire to hold everyone to in all phases of life – before, after, and during college. By helping them we help us all.

I hope you are as excited about this project as I am! Please take the time to check out our submission guidelines and frequently asked questions. If you have any questions please email ironmaidensanthology@gmail.com. (Please title the email “Query – [question summary]“) Thank you for taking the time to visit!
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Lá Fhéil Bride)
Announcing our Call for Submissions for a new publication from Goddess Ink:

Brigit: Fire of Womanhood
edited by Patricia Monaghan and Michael McDermott

It is with great enthusiasm that we invite you to submit a proposal as a part of an anthology of work to be published by Goddess Ink (www.goddess-ink.com ). This anthology, comprising works about the Celtic Goddess and Christian saint Brigit, will be edited Patricia Monaghan and Michael McDermott, scholars and devotees of Brigit.

We are seeking submissions in any printable form, including but not limited to:

Scholarly essays
Personal essays
PoetryInterior artwork (including small line drawings, in black and white)
Cover and Back artwork (color)
ChantsInvocation


Deadline for submissions: July 1, 2012
Planned publishing date for the anthology: Imbolc 2013.

Please direct inquiries to BrigitAnthology@gmail.com

To submit: for prose submissions, please send 150-word abstract outlining your approach to the subject; other submissions should be sent complete, with limit of 3 poems or chants per author. Include 150-word biography.

We thank you for your interest in this project.
Michael McDermott and Patricia Monaghan
Co-editors, Brigit: Fire of Womanhood
erynn: Gaelic merman image (05 nin)
Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition Conference 2012

July 14-15, Milwaukee, WI

Call for Abstracts:

Since 2001, the Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition (JWMT) has worked to publish diverse perspectives on the occultisms, magical practices, mysticisms and esotericisms commonly known as the “Western Mystery Tradition.” The JWMT is expanding the work of the web journal through its first conference.

The JWMT conference is a two-day event open to scholars, students, practitioners, and the public. The keynote speaker is the Journal’s founder and publisher, Dr. Jeffrey S. Kupperman.

The study of western esoteric practices has risen greatly over the last decade, focusing on Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Modern magical practices and beliefs, outside of the realm of modern Paganisms and the New Age, have received little attention. Further, practitioners have had little opportunity to present their work, either as papers or in the form of ritual practice, outside of the internet or small groups. The focus of this conference is the movement of contemporary western esotericisms, loosely construed as the “western mysteries,” and their transition from the 20th to the 21st century. The Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition Conference 2012 is seeking abstracts for presentations, panels and practices centered on this broad subject.
Topics may include, but are not limited to:

Esoteric traditions such as Freemasonry, Rosicrucianism, Martinism and chivalric organizations,

Ritual magical practices from organizations such as the Golden Dawn and the Aurum Solis and modern initiatory Paganisms,

Esotericisms from earlier periods, such as alchemy, Gnosticism and Neoplatonism, the magical work of John Dee or the medieval grimoire traditions, and their re-emergence and relevancy to modern praxes,

Theoretical, paedogogical, and methodological approaches to the study of the western mysteries,

The relation of the esotericisms to orthodox and mainstream practices and society at large.

We welcome presentations, panels and practices focusing on methodological and theoretical issues in relation to the contemporary study and practice of the various western esoteric currents. The conference encourages an interdisciplinary approach and welcomes perspectives from the disciplines of religious studies, theology, anthropology, sociology, psychology, philosophy, history, political science, as well as active practitioners. Papers should last 20 minutes, with time for questions and answers. Panels and practices will be scheduled for up to an hour, with time for questions and answers afterwards as necessary.

Please submit abstracts (approx. 200 words), proposals for a themed panel (with three presenters, moderator as necessary, and short description) or proposals for a ritual practice and discussion to conference@jwmt.org. Deadline for submissions is April 15, 2012.

No attachments please; copy and paste your abstract or proposal in plain text into the body of the e-mail. Submissions are not limited to academics or professional scholars. Include a brief (no more than one page) CV listing any qualifications, academic or otherwise, relevant to your proposal.

The conference will be held at the Best Western Plus Milwaukee Airport Hotel and Conference Center. More information on the conference, registration, fees, accommodation, etc. is available at http://www.jwmt.org/jwmt12.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (all your books!)
Call for Submissions! We are now accepting submissions for The Shining Cities: An Anthology of Pagan Science Fiction, edited by Rebecca Buchanan. We are interested in short stories from every subgenre of science fiction, including, but not limited to:

alternate history
anthropological science fiction
apocalyptic
biopunk
cyberpunk
feminist science fiction
hard science fiction
military science fiction
space opera
space western
steampunk
superhero/superhuman
time travel

The only defining criterion is that the story be Pagan or polytheist in some way. So, for instance, a Wiccan colony on Mars trying to adapt the Wheel of the Year to their new world; or an anthropologist traveling back in time to study the clash between Christianity and native Heathenry in northern Europe; or a group of Artemis devotees violently protesting the industrial development of a pristine alien world; or a small community of Kemetics in the near future trying to figure out how to survive after the world economy crashes; or a superheroine who is a devotee of Pele battling her archnemesis; or Julian the Apostate *not* dying and the effect that has on world history.

We are also interested in nonfiction essays on related topics. For instance, essays on the Antikythera Device; the place of Euclid in the history of mathematics; the contributions of ancient Pagan philosopher/scientists to the growth of scientific knowledge; Pagan and mythological themes in modern science fiction; and so forth.

The submissions period opens 1 January 2012 and closes 30 June 2012, with an anticipated release date of August 2012. Contributors will be provided with a coupon code which will allow them to purchase three at-cost copies.

No plagiarism! And no fanfiction!

Send all submissions, comments and queries to baeditor@gmail. com.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (writy fountain pen)
These are the same folks who did the anthology on disability and religious diversity.

Call for Chapters

Title: Chronic Illness and Spirituality: Diverse Disciplinary, Religious, and Cultural Perspectives

Edited by: Darla Schumm, Michael Stoltzfus, and Rebecca Green

Deadline for abstract submissions: January 30, 2012

Email: dschumm@hollins.edu & mjstoltz@valdosta.edu

The editors of Chronic Illness and Spirituality: Diverse Disciplinary, Religious, and Cultural Perspectives invite contributions for an interreligious, multicultural, and interdisciplinary collection of chapters that critically examines how the spiritual traditions of the world represent and respond to chronic illness. We welcome a wide variety of methodological, theoretical, and practical approaches including ethnography, historical, cultural, or textual analysis, personal narrative, and theological/philosophical investigation.

Where appropriate, contributors are encouraged to incorporate into their analysis literary and theoretical perspectives from a wide variety of both spiritual/religious traditions as well as from academic and practice disciplines such as sociology, nursing, medicine, disability studies, and feminist studies.

Our aim is to produce a comparative work which gives voice to scholars and practitioners from many of the world’s rich and varied spiritual traditions and reflects multi-cultural and interdisciplinary perspectives on the intersection of religion and chronic illness.

We hope that our manuscript will appeal to a broad audience including people living with chronic illness, students and scholars from many disciplines, healthcare professionals, and religious practitioners from diverse spiritual and cultural traditions.

Abstracts not to exceed 600 words are due by January 30, 2012 and should be sent to dschumm@hollins.edu and mjstoltz@valdosta.edu.

Please submit your work in APA format.

Please note that acceptance of an abstract does not guarantee inclusion in the collection; editors will review and make final decisions upon receipt of the completed chapters and in collaboration with the publisher. First drafts of chapters will be due on or before June 30, 2012. Any questions may be directed to Darla Schumm and Michael Stoltzfus at the addresses listed above.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

• Representation and response to chronic illness in particular religious/spiritual traditions including: Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Christianity, Taoism, Confucianism, Baha’i, Sikh, Jain, or others
• Indigenous and/or native religions/spiritualities and chronic illness
• Celtic, Druid, and/or Wiccan religions/spiritualities and chronic illness
• Chronic illness and inter-religious comparison, contrast, or dialogue
• Chronic illness and cross-cultural comparison, contrast, or dialogue
• Chronic illness and spirituality in contrast/dialogue with health care
• Exploring the similarities and differences between chronic illnesses like lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, or others and chronic disabilities like blindness, deafness, paralysis or others and reflecting on their potential spiritual or cultural ramifications
• The meaning of physical, moral, and spiritual cultivation, healing, renewal, and vitality when an illness is persistent and cure is unlikely
• Religious and/or sacred texts and chronic illness
• Chronic illness, spiritual insight/practice, and changing self-identity
• Reflections on the themes of invisibility and unpredictability (often affiliated with chronic illness) in relationship to religious/spiritual understanding and practice
• Critical perspectives on religion/spirituality, society, and chronic illness
• Holistic components of well-being that focus upon the relationships between mind, body, spirituality, and environment
• Exploring the relationship between spiritual practice and the ability to cope with chronic illness
• Illness narratives as they relate to autobiographical religious/spiritual transformations
• Challenging traditional approaches to hope, sin, suffering, gratitude, love or other core religious/spiritual themes from the perspective of living with chronic illness
• Religion, stigma, marginalization, ethics, and chronic illness
• Chronic illness as bodily betrayal and subsequent efforts to find harmony between body, self, and world
• Chronic illness as it relates to personal, social, and spiritual meaning or identity formation
• Other relevant topics, themes, issues
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Book of Dreams)
Passing this along for a friend. Please note all the details.

Trans*, Gender/queer, Gender Variant, Questioning -and generally all around not cis- Sci-Fi Zine Callout

hay there, all! we’ve taken all the feedback and critiques received from a number of online spots and are releasing an updated/revised callout. we appreciate all the attention this project has received and are really excited about it. please continue to let us know what you think! <3

Calling all: alien shes, animorphs, astrologists, celestial beings, clairvoyants, closet monsters, comix nerds, cyberpunx, cyborg feminists, deep sea divers, discordians, dungeon masters, dystopian sluts, elves & fairies, evil robots, extremophiles, genderqueer cans o’beans, glam goths, glamarchists, griminals, hackers, horror fiends, intergalactic babestars, kids who read about inanimate objects coming to life, techies, Linux geeks, mad scientists, pervy bookworms, post-apocalyptic prophets, sexy clones, star bellied boys, stargazers, steampunks, superqueerdos, Tralfamadorians, Trekkies, witches, wizards, wizard’s apprentices, vampire slayers, vamp tramps, superqueerdos, vengeful librarians, zombie survivalists, 1-800-psychics, and lovely so-ons… who aren’t cis

We’re hoping to compile a rag tag collection of short sci-fi/horror/fantasy stories written by trans*, gender/queer, gender variant, questioning, or otherwise fabulous peeps. For the first volume, we’re hoping folks will consider, for your writing pleasure, the vague theme of ‘Solution-Oriented Dystopia’ and anything that may encompass.

After many (encrypted web-based) chatz we got to talking about the ways in which non-cis folk often gravitate towards each other to discuss our experiences living in a cis-centric world, and the ways we move through those worlds. These conversations often include talking about hard shit, sharing coping mechanisms, and plotting to tear down and piss glitter on the ruins of the realities that bring violence against us. and also, we talked a lot about sci-fi.

oppressive language gets put on us by so-called experts who feel entitled to narrate our lives and dictate what our bodies should or shouldn’t look like. our stories get spelled out to us by ‘professionals’ and/or any jerk who wants to tell some fucked up joke. so we wanna reclaim ourselves and narratives through sci-fi. we wanna create fictions that could become realities, in some other quantum reality in the not-so-distant future/past/present.

we chose the theme of Solution-Oriented Dystopia because we want to talk about the terrible shit that happens to us and our loved ones by way of creative processes. We don’t wanna gloss over those things, because silence = death. our silence does anything but protect us, and for that reason we would rather obscure cis-centric worlds than pretend they don’t exist.

we think that writing is an escape hatch, an ejection seat out of the cis-centric death machine on a collision course to monotony. it’s an opportunity to not just work through, but speak out against, the ways in which the world fucks with us on a daily basis - and be fabulously geekxcore sassy while doing so.

deadline for submissions: february 2, the day of satanic revels

submission guidelines:
-no poetry (we love you… but…)
-The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America Award guidelines state that a short story is anything under 7,499 words. But… seriously. In keeping with the on-going life theme of railing against everything, we’re hoping you stick to between 1,500 - 2,000 words long (shorter is okay too)
-grammar and capitalization is whatever.
-send in .doc, .odt
-justified margins

send submissions to: niqandperry@gmail.com
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Book of Dreams)
Call for Submissions/Writers:

E-mail for inquiries and submissions: tara.miller21 (at) gmail.com; please put "Immanion Press Anthology Submission" in your subject line.

Megalithica Books, an imprint of Immanion Press (Stafford, U.K./Portland, OR, U.S.A.) is seeking submissions for a magic anthology from the perspective of practitioners with disabilities or developmental differences. This includes but is not limited to practitioners with mental, cognitive, emotional, physical or sensory impairments and/or practitioners who are part of the Deaf or Blind community. We have not come up with a title for the anthology yet. That will hopefully present itself through the contributions.

There is much debate about how to define the words "disabled" and "disabilities". For the purpose of this publication; however, we'll use the World Health Organization's definition: "Disabilities is an umbrella term, covering impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. An impairment is a problem in body function or structure; an activity limitation is a difficulty encountered by an individual in executing a task or action; while a participation restriction is a problem experienced by an individual in involvement in life situations."

This anthology is intended to explore magical, occult, and esoteric topics from the view points of practitioners who are disabled or part of the Deaf and Blind community. Equality and access within the magic/Pagan community and society in general are important issues. You can include them as a part of your submission but not the whole. Keep in mind that addressing such topics aren't the sole purpose of this anthology. When thinking about your submission consider what rituals and practices are or have been most beneficial to you. What mystical or magical experiences or knowledge shaped your life for the better? Contributors can be from any magical background or tradition. With all Megalithica publications, the intention with this anthology is to go beyond introductory matters whenever possible.

We are accepting:
essays (academic and personal)
short rituals, prayers, meditations, activities, or spells (not lists of correspondences)

We are especially interested in rituals that take into account limited mobility or immobility, sight impairments, and rituals for the Deaf and blind. Also, some practitioners with disabilities have limited attention spans and would benefit from shorter rituals that include minimal visualization.

Some suggested topics:

Practicing magic in hospitals or other facilities. How can you improvise while complying with facility regulations?

Is the state of the body and mind a reflection of a persons purity or power? Is it a sign of the practitioner working out past wrongs?

Psychological or physical emergencies as shamanic or magical breakthroughs.

Do we choose our bodies and experiences? Do the Gods/Goddesses or Divinity create our bodies or experiences this way for a reason?

Medical symbols and their Pagan history and magical properties. How to enchant and use these symbols.

Gods and Goddesses of Health- such as Asclepius and his daughters. For example: Hygieia whose name is the source of the word hygiene. There is a lot of Pagan history in the medical community.

How to discern spirits, entities and magical experiences when you are dealing with health issues that can impair judgment such as being on pain medication, dealing with mental illness, etc.

How a disability or impairment offers a new perspective on magic practice and theory.

How communing with nature has it's rewards (i.e. ecopsychology or closeness to a specific God(dess) etc.) and challenges (i.e. mobility issues)

Working magic with companion and/or guide animals or stories about their spiritual significance.

What are some ways to find self-acceptance and empowerment?

Viewing scars from surgery, injury or otherwise as part of your story or "battle scars" or proof of survival.

From the first diagnosis of disease or disability to the loss of a physical function or independence, we feel grief. How can we cope with grief?

Ways to mend the fragmented self i.e. lucid dreaming, soul retrieval, astral travel.

Working with archetypes or mythic images.

These suggestions barely touch the myriad of possibilities. We're interested in any other topics contributors wish to explore. It's your voices that will make this anthology powerful and possible.

Requirements for submission:
Citations for all quoted, paraphrased, or otherwise unoriginal material
Bibliography for works cited
Use the Modern Language Association (MLA) Style http://www.library.cornell.edu/resrch/citmanage/mla
Send the file in Word or RTF format

Do write in your voice! If you're academically inclined or trained, feel free to be as intelligent and technical as you like. If your work entirely speaks in the first person about your own experience, that is also permissible, but please use a more formal writing style for as much as possible in your piece that is not quoted speech. Unless you do so sparingly, or define your terms (either in the main text or footnotes), DO NOT use lolcat-speak, text message speak, or anything else that could be considered para-English. Our lives are full of abbreviations and "lingo" which we understand but others may not, even people with different disabilities. Please define any "lingo" you use such as Talk Doc (psychotherapist) or P Doc (psychologist) or medical abbreviations.

Rough drafts are due March 01, 2012. These drafts will be edited in a back-and-forth process with the editor. Essays need to be 1500-4000 words, although if your work falls outside those limits, do submit it – we can discuss this during the editing process. Do drop me an email if you are unsure whether your idea fits into the content. We hope to include many voices and the sooner you start the communication process the better.

If your essay is not accepted for the anthology, we will tell you after the first round of edits. All contributors will be provided with a contract upon final acceptance of their essays, not when they are accepted for editing. Compensation will be a free print copy or an e-book of the anthology when it is published and additional copies sold at 40% off the cover price to contributors.

The anthology will be edited by Tara "Masery" Miller. Her blog, the Staff of Asclepius, is featured in the Pagan Portal at Patheos.com. It's for Pagans with mental, physical or sensory impairments; who are in recovery from major injuries or addiction; and/or who are members of the Deaf or Blind community. "It's a place to share how a spiritual and magical life gives us strength or peace through all of life's joys and struggles. There are also news updates and interviews with Pagans and experts on various topics affecting the community." http://www.patheos.com/community/paganswithdisabilities/ She has Turner Mosaic which created a massive failure of her endocrine system causing many health problems.

Immanion Press is a small independent press based in the United Kingdom. Founded by author Storm Constantine in 2003, it expanded into occult nonfiction in 2004 with the publication of Taylor Ellwood's Pop Culture Magick. Today, Immanion's nonfiction line, under the Megalithica Books imprint, has a growing reputation for edgy, experimental texts on primarily intermediate and advanced pagan and occult topics. Find out more at http://www.immanion-press.com.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (all your books!)
The Esoteric Book Conference is seeking proposals for the 2012 conference by way of speakers, artists, and performance artists.

The deadline for proposals is end of day January 15th, 2012.

Speakers are encouraged to submit talks touching on historical or contemporary esoteric subjects. We are after presentations as opposed to practical workshop submissions. Presentations that relate to esoteric book[s] in particular or coincide with a new or recent release are favorable given the specific focus of the conference. Talks should be 45 - 60 minutes in length including time for questions. A short abstract describing the talk and its title should accompany your contact information.

Artists are encouraged to submit art related to the esoteric field. In addition to the art show proper the conference will also have prints available by accepted artists.

Performance Art submissions are being accepted for the Saturday night evening entertainment portion of the conference. We are seeking proposals from ritual artists through various performance mediums. Performance artists are encouraged to submit a proposal that outlines what they intend to perform at the conference specifically. Please include any photos and samples of music, performance, or art that is relevant to your proposal. PLEASE NOTE: It is preferred that if sending a proposal for a ritual performance piece, that you include a video showing an excerpt of you or your group doing a performance with that intent.

Submissions should be sent to: submissions@esotericbookconference.com

All submissions should include the following information:

1. Full Name.
2. Contact Details (please include email address, mailing address, phone number)
3. Short biography.
4. Abstract of Talk [speakers] or Samples of Work [artists] or Abstract of Ritual Performance Intent, Video, Photos, and/or Examples of Music [performance artists] .
5. If published please indicate titles and publishers.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (writy typewriter keyboard)
Call for Chapters

Title: Chronic Illness and Spirituality: Diverse Disciplinary, Religious, and Cultural Perspectives

Edited by: Darla Schumm, Michael Stoltzfus, and Rebecca Green

Deadline for abstract submissions: January 30, 2012

Email: dschumm@hollins.edu & mjstoltz@valdosta.edu

The editors of Chronic Illness and Spirituality: Diverse Disciplinary, Religious, and Cultural Perspectives invite contributions for an interreligious, multicultural, and interdisciplinary collection of chapters that critically examines how the spiritual traditions of the world represent and respond to chronic illness. We welcome a wide variety of methodological, theoretical, and practical approaches including ethnography, historical, cultural, or textual analysis, personal narrative, and theological/philosophical investigation.

Where appropriate, contributors are encouraged to incorporate into their analysis literary and theoretical perspectives from a wide variety of both spiritual/religious traditions as well as from academic and practice disciplines such as sociology, nursing, medicine, disability studies, and feminist studies. Our aim is to produce a comparative work which gives voice to scholars and practitioners from many of the world’s rich and varied spiritual traditions and reflects multi-cultural and interdisciplinary perspectives on the intersection of religion and chronic illness. We hope that our manuscript will appeal to a broad audience including people living with chronic illness, students and scholars from many disciplines, healthcare professionals, and religious practitioners from diverse spiritual and cultural traditions.

Abstracts not to exceed 600 words are due by January 30, 2012 and should be sent to dschumm@hollins.edu and mjstoltz@valdosta.edu.

Please submit your work in APA format.

Please note that acceptance of an abstract does not guarantee inclusion in the collection; editors will review and make final decisions upon receipt of the completed chapters and in collaboration with the publisher.

First drafts of chapters will be due on or before June 30, 2012. Any questions may be directed to Darla Schumm and Michael Stoltzfus at the addresses listed above.


Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

• Representation and response to chronic illness in particular religious/spiritual traditions including: Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Christianity, Taoism, Confucianism, Baha’i, Sikh, Jain, or others
• Indigenous and/or native religions/spiritualities and chronic illness
• Celtic, Druid, and/or Wiccan religions/spiritualities and chronic illness
• Chronic illness and inter-religious comparison, contrast, or dialogue
• Chronic illness and cross-cultural comparison, contrast, or dialogue
• Chronic illness and spirituality in contrast/dialogue with health care
• Exploring the similarities and differences between chronic illnesses like lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, or others and chronic disabilities like blindness, deafness, paralysis or others and reflecting on their potential spiritual or cultural ramifications
• The meaning of physical, moral, and spiritual cultivation, healing, renewal, and vitality when an illness is persistent and cure is unlikely
• Religious and/or sacred texts and chronic illness
• Chronic illness, spiritual insight/practice, and changing self-identity
• Reflections on the themes of invisibility and unpredictability (often affiliated with chronic illness) in relationship to religious/spiritual understanding and practice
• Critical perspectives on religion/spirituality, society, and chronic illness
• Holistic components of well-being that focus upon the relationships between mind, body, spirituality, and environment
• Exploring the relationship between spiritual practice and the ability to cope with chronic illness
• Illness narratives as they relate to autobiographical religious/spiritual transformations
• Challenging traditional approaches to hope, sin, suffering, gratitude, love or other core religious/spiritual themes from the perspective of living with chronic illness
• Religion, stigma, marginalization, ethics, and chronic illness
• Chronic illness as bodily betrayal and subsequent efforts to find harmony between body, self, and world
• Chronic illness as it relates to personal, social, and spiritual meaning or identity formation
• Other relevant topics, themes, issues
erynn: Gaelic merman image (raven cawing)
Hello folks,

I am currently compiling a devotional anthology in honor of The Morrigan. If you know Her and would like to share your experiences, prayers, etc., your time and words would be sincerely appreciated. That said, I will post the "official call" that went out to facebook to give everyone the full information:

I am currently collecting submissions for a devotional honoring The Morrigan. Please consider offering poetry, fiction, details of your personal experience, rituals, prayers, pictures, and/or anything else you feel called to give to Her.
Please keep in mind that any artwork submitted, save for the cover art, will be printed in black and white. I am looking for cover art, so if you feel called, feel free to submit. Suggestions for a title are also welcomed.

The cut-off for submissions is 11:59 pm EST on August 1st, 2012.
Please send all submissions to: rossnic4@msu.edu

Attachments are okay, but please put them in .rtf format.
Please save pictures in .png or other lossless formats.

Once finished, the anthology will be sent to Asphodel Press for publication. I'm aiming for release by October 31st, 2012.
All contributors will receive a copy of the anthology as compensation.

Please feel free to invite/notify anyone you feel might be interested.

Thank you!

Profile

erynn: Gaelic merman image (Default)
erynn

September 2013

S M T W T F S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Tags

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags