erynn: Gaelic merman image (Music by Leonardo)
More photos from last year's trip to Europe. These are from the Festival Interceltique in Lorient, from the grand parade. Most of the photos I got were taken really haphazard, holding my camera up over my head to get shots over the crowd. I was not the only one doing this. Below the cut, musicians and dancers!

On to Brittany! )
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Have you seen this wizard?)
Today started out with a drive through the town of Josselin, where they have a really beautiful castle. I took some photos from above the town, where there was a good view, and then from below the castle on a little bridge, where many photos of the structure are taken. Because of the time of day, the sun was behind the towers above me and I had trouble getting a photo from that angle that didn't have any Jesus beams all over it. I'm not sure how it will turn out, but we'll see.

We headed out after that to Merlin's Tomb, a very small megalith structure that is surrounded with a vaguely paved circle of modern stones. The place was crawling with tourists and many people had left offerings and notes of different sorts there. I did get a few photos without a lot of people in them, but all the sites we went to today were quite busy. I suspect a good deal of it was because it's the high season, and because it was a really nice, mostly sunny and fairly warm day today. The "tomb" was on a four kilometer loop trail, but was very near the beginning, so we didn't have to do the whole trail. Close by was a "fountain of youth" which, contrary to what you might think, was a well where infants and young children were bathed for their health, not a place where adults could get eternal youth.

After this, we went to an ancient oak tree, estimated to be about 1,000 or so years old. Of all the places I've encountered in Brittany, this one actually felt the most sacred, was the most quiet, and had a sense of reverence in the people visiting. It was quite different from the other places with a lot of people at them. We took quite a few photos here, but didn't stay very long, because we had a fair bit still to do during the day. I would have loved to stay longer and sit, but I find it difficult to meditate with a bunch of other non-affiliated people around, and my hosts were being very patient with me as it was.

Once we got back to the car, we went out searching for the fountain where Merlin met Viviane. The GPS kept trying to send us down closed private roads, or down roads that no longer exist, so we gave up on it for a bit and went to the Arthurian center instead. This was a kind of cool place in a partly ruined castle. Rather than being a museum, as I suppose I had expected, it was a center filled with Arthurian fantasy art, informational placards, and life-sized dioramas of various incidents in the lives of Arthur, Merlin, and others from the Grail cycle. Although everything was in French, I noted they had material there about Lí Ban and a figure that is apparently similar to her in Breton folklore. They also had a story about a madman who was associated in some way with the ancient oak we had just visited, and had some information about the location of the fountain/well we were searching for. Though the place was a touch cheesy, it was obviously lovingly done, and no expense was spared in collecting art or setting up the tableux.

As we drove, [livejournal.com profile] eydimork was telling me about a local legend that Merlin was not actually buried in the tomb we'd visited, but that he had climbed a tree and ascended from there into heaven, never to return. I thought that was rather interesting in light of both the whole poets ascending the tree motif, and of the association of Suibhne with flight and perching in trees. She said she'd find me some references for some of this, even though most of it was just online and probably local oral tradition in origin. If I can find any kind of documentation at all, it will be useful for my geilt and filidecht research, I think.

All of this stuff is said to be in the forest of Broceliande. Very beautiful area. When we stopped for lunch, the restaurant had placemats with tourist maps of local legendary sites and points of interest, which showed us the approximate location of the fountain we were looking for and, armed with that and the name of the village the fountain was near, we were finally able to find it at last.

This was also an approximately 4km loop trail, but the well was pretty much right at the midpoint, so we did do the whole walk. The trail was fairly muddy, and some of it looked rather like a logging road. There were some stacks of felled trees along the side of the trail, marked with numbers, obviously for shipping out later. Still, the area was largely peaceful, even though there were literally tour busses of children who had been hauled out to the site. We managed to get out to the well, get some photos, and move along before it was swamped with noisy kids.

Tonight for dinner, I had the local scallop dish that I was told about (which name escapes me), and it was quite tasty. Certainly worth having! Tonight I'll be off to bed soon -- tomorrow morning I have to catch the train for the airport near Paris, then fly off to Prague. The sib has already started his trip up there and will be spending the night tonight in Germany. Tomorrow I'll see him, [livejournal.com profile] tdancinghands, and her husband. I can't wait!

[livejournal.com profile] eydimork and Magnus have been wonderful hosts, even though I have spent a fair bit of the time here in kind of lousy shape. They have been kind and patient and taken me to ludicrous lengths to see piles of rocks and water coming out of the ground. And a parade, which we didn't actually see much of. Magnus gave me a copy of his heavy klezmer cd, which I had him sign. I will have to play it for certain of my friends who will appreciate both the music and the irony. ;)

I'll try to post something before I head out in the morning. Happy happy, y'all!
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Have you seen this wizard?)
Today started out with a drive through the town of Josselin, where they have a really beautiful castle. I took some photos from above the town, where there was a good view, and then from below the castle on a little bridge, where many photos of the structure are taken. Because of the time of day, the sun was behind the towers above me and I had trouble getting a photo from that angle that didn't have any Jesus beams all over it. I'm not sure how it will turn out, but we'll see.

We headed out after that to Merlin's Tomb, a very small megalith structure that is surrounded with a vaguely paved circle of modern stones. The place was crawling with tourists and many people had left offerings and notes of different sorts there. I did get a few photos without a lot of people in them, but all the sites we went to today were quite busy. I suspect a good deal of it was because it's the high season, and because it was a really nice, mostly sunny and fairly warm day today. The "tomb" was on a four kilometer loop trail, but was very near the beginning, so we didn't have to do the whole trail. Close by was a "fountain of youth" which, contrary to what you might think, was a well where infants and young children were bathed for their health, not a place where adults could get eternal youth.

After this, we went to an ancient oak tree, estimated to be about 1,000 or so years old. Of all the places I've encountered in Brittany, this one actually felt the most sacred, was the most quiet, and had a sense of reverence in the people visiting. It was quite different from the other places with a lot of people at them. We took quite a few photos here, but didn't stay very long, because we had a fair bit still to do during the day. I would have loved to stay longer and sit, but I find it difficult to meditate with a bunch of other non-affiliated people around, and my hosts were being very patient with me as it was.

Once we got back to the car, we went out searching for the fountain where Merlin met Viviane. The GPS kept trying to send us down closed private roads, or down roads that no longer exist, so we gave up on it for a bit and went to the Arthurian center instead. This was a kind of cool place in a partly ruined castle. Rather than being a museum, as I suppose I had expected, it was a center filled with Arthurian fantasy art, informational placards, and life-sized dioramas of various incidents in the lives of Arthur, Merlin, and others from the Grail cycle. Although everything was in French, I noted they had material there about Lí Ban and a figure that is apparently similar to her in Breton folklore. They also had a story about a madman who was associated in some way with the ancient oak we had just visited, and had some information about the location of the fountain/well we were searching for. Though the place was a touch cheesy, it was obviously lovingly done, and no expense was spared in collecting art or setting up the tableux.

As we drove, [livejournal.com profile] eydimork was telling me about a local legend that Merlin was not actually buried in the tomb we'd visited, but that he had climbed a tree and ascended from there into heaven, never to return. I thought that was rather interesting in light of both the whole poets ascending the tree motif, and of the association of Suibhne with flight and perching in trees. She said she'd find me some references for some of this, even though most of it was just online and probably local oral tradition in origin. If I can find any kind of documentation at all, it will be useful for my geilt and filidecht research, I think.

All of this stuff is said to be in the forest of Broceliande. Very beautiful area. When we stopped for lunch, the restaurant had placemats with tourist maps of local legendary sites and points of interest, which showed us the approximate location of the fountain we were looking for and, armed with that and the name of the village the fountain was near, we were finally able to find it at last.

This was also an approximately 4km loop trail, but the well was pretty much right at the midpoint, so we did do the whole walk. The trail was fairly muddy, and some of it looked rather like a logging road. There were some stacks of felled trees along the side of the trail, marked with numbers, obviously for shipping out later. Still, the area was largely peaceful, even though there were literally tour busses of children who had been hauled out to the site. We managed to get out to the well, get some photos, and move along before it was swamped with noisy kids.

Tonight for dinner, I had the local scallop dish that I was told about (which name escapes me), and it was quite tasty. Certainly worth having! Tonight I'll be off to bed soon -- tomorrow morning I have to catch the train for the airport near Paris, then fly off to Prague. The sib has already started his trip up there and will be spending the night tonight in Germany. Tomorrow I'll see him, [livejournal.com profile] tdancinghands, and her husband. I can't wait!

[livejournal.com profile] eydimork and Magnus have been wonderful hosts, even though I have spent a fair bit of the time here in kind of lousy shape. They have been kind and patient and taken me to ludicrous lengths to see piles of rocks and water coming out of the ground. And a parade, which we didn't actually see much of. Magnus gave me a copy of his heavy klezmer cd, which I had him sign. I will have to play it for certain of my friends who will appreciate both the music and the irony. ;)

I'll try to post something before I head out in the morning. Happy happy, y'all!
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Everything Hurts)
Yesterday we got up early to head out to Lorient for Festival Interceltique. We figured an hour's travel time (ish) and then 20 minutes or so to find parking and we'ld get ourselves to the Grande Parade that opens the festivities.

Except not.

This thing is so huge that they have people parking in the next towns over and bussing them in to a central point where you can catch a bus back to your car later. We arrived in town about 20 minutes after the parade started, and the streets were lined half a dozen or more deep in places. For the first while, we couldn't hardly see anything. I took photos as best I could by holding my camera up over the crow and pointing it in the general direction of the action. This, at least, can work with the new digitals that have a screen on the back instead of a tiny viewfinder the way they used to.

Eventually my legs and hips started giving me trouble, as we'd been standing still on the pavement for a while. We decided to wander along and see if we could find a better place, or maybe get around the crowd to the other side of the parade route, where all the restaurants and booths were. Between finding dead ends where the sidewalk was entirely blocked (tv cameras and whatnot) and finding a couple of places where the parade was actually visible, then making our way around the stadium where the parade actually ended (you could get seats inside for 10e), it probably took us at least an hour to cross the street. And the parade was only halfway over by then. It had started at 10am and the first actual events weren't scheduled to start until 2pm, so I figure that the parade lasted until at least 1:30 in the afternoon.

Anyway, we made our way around to the other side and perused some of the food booths and restaurants lining the streets. Most everything we saw was pork and more pork, or egg and more egg, or spuds and more spuds. Eventually we saw one place that was serving mussels (with fries) and galettes, so we stopped there. [livejournal.com profile] eydimork and Magnus got the mussels (I want to try some, and some scallops, today maybe), and I had a galette with mushrooms and a cream sauce, and a little Breton cider. Very tasty, I must admit.

After this, we wandered the booths for a while and I picked up a t-shirt for the event. By then the parade had finally dispersed enough that you could cross the road without walking a mile out of your way, and we made our way back to the car, from whence we departed for Carnac.

The megalithic alignment there is about 4km long, so I was only able to see part of it. The place was quite crowded, and the area was fenced off so that the tourists wouldn't over-run it. I had at first wondered if it was a real sacred site because I didn't see any sheep or cattle, but in another enclosure there were some sheep grazing and having a lie-down, so I was satisfied that they hadn't just carted in plastic stones to mollify the tourists. ;) Many photos were taken, we stopped at the little gift shop and museum and I picked up a couple of books in English, one on the alignments themselves, and one on places in Brittany. (The book lists a castle in the nearest town of any size, which really is a lovely thing and I'll have to take pictures when we go by probably tomorrow on the way back to Rennes for the train.)

Just as we were finishing up the part of the site that we'd decided to look around, the rain started coming down. It poured like crazy a fair bit of the way back to La Ville aux Gentiles (those three houses where I have increased the human population of the village by 10% just by visiting), and I was really exhausted and in a lot of pain by the time we got back here. I was barely able to eat anything for dinner and went to bed early, but sat up for a little bit upstairs and caught up with email. I also spent a little bit of time catching up with the folks in #writechat, as it was about that time, and I had net access.

Today it will be some Merlin sites and perhaps an Arthurian museum, if I'm up to it. My left hip is still giving me a fair bit of trouble, but we'll be in the forest for the most part, not on pavement, so it should be a little easier on me today.

Here's a pic by [livejournal.com profile] eydimork of me at Carnac:

Uploaded from the Photobucket iPad App
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Everything Hurts)
Yesterday we got up early to head out to Lorient for Festival Interceltique. We figured an hour's travel time (ish) and then 20 minutes or so to find parking and we'ld get ourselves to the Grande Parade that opens the festivities.

Except not.

This thing is so huge that they have people parking in the next towns over and bussing them in to a central point where you can catch a bus back to your car later. We arrived in town about 20 minutes after the parade started, and the streets were lined half a dozen or more deep in places. For the first while, we couldn't hardly see anything. I took photos as best I could by holding my camera up over the crow and pointing it in the general direction of the action. This, at least, can work with the new digitals that have a screen on the back instead of a tiny viewfinder the way they used to.

Eventually my legs and hips started giving me trouble, as we'd been standing still on the pavement for a while. We decided to wander along and see if we could find a better place, or maybe get around the crowd to the other side of the parade route, where all the restaurants and booths were. Between finding dead ends where the sidewalk was entirely blocked (tv cameras and whatnot) and finding a couple of places where the parade was actually visible, then making our way around the stadium where the parade actually ended (you could get seats inside for 10e), it probably took us at least an hour to cross the street. And the parade was only halfway over by then. It had started at 10am and the first actual events weren't scheduled to start until 2pm, so I figure that the parade lasted until at least 1:30 in the afternoon.

Anyway, we made our way around to the other side and perused some of the food booths and restaurants lining the streets. Most everything we saw was pork and more pork, or egg and more egg, or spuds and more spuds. Eventually we saw one place that was serving mussels (with fries) and galettes, so we stopped there. [livejournal.com profile] eydimork and Magnus got the mussels (I want to try some, and some scallops, today maybe), and I had a galette with mushrooms and a cream sauce, and a little Breton cider. Very tasty, I must admit.

After this, we wandered the booths for a while and I picked up a t-shirt for the event. By then the parade had finally dispersed enough that you could cross the road without walking a mile out of your way, and we made our way back to the car, from whence we departed for Carnac.

The megalithic alignment there is about 4km long, so I was only able to see part of it. The place was quite crowded, and the area was fenced off so that the tourists wouldn't over-run it. I had at first wondered if it was a real sacred site because I didn't see any sheep or cattle, but in another enclosure there were some sheep grazing and having a lie-down, so I was satisfied that they hadn't just carted in plastic stones to mollify the tourists. ;) Many photos were taken, we stopped at the little gift shop and museum and I picked up a couple of books in English, one on the alignments themselves, and one on places in Brittany. (The book lists a castle in the nearest town of any size, which really is a lovely thing and I'll have to take pictures when we go by probably tomorrow on the way back to Rennes for the train.)

Just as we were finishing up the part of the site that we'd decided to look around, the rain started coming down. It poured like crazy a fair bit of the way back to La Ville aux Gentiles (those three houses where I have increased the human population of the village by 10% just by visiting), and I was really exhausted and in a lot of pain by the time we got back here. I was barely able to eat anything for dinner and went to bed early, but sat up for a little bit upstairs and caught up with email. I also spent a little bit of time catching up with the folks in #writechat, as it was about that time, and I had net access.

Today it will be some Merlin sites and perhaps an Arthurian museum, if I'm up to it. My left hip is still giving me a fair bit of trouble, but we'll be in the forest for the most part, not on pavement, so it should be a little easier on me today.

Here's a pic by [livejournal.com profile] eydimork of me at Carnac:

Uploaded from the Photobucket iPad App
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Whitman: not all who wander)
I was picked up right on time by [livejournal.com profile] eydimork and her husband and have been thoroughly slobbered by their dog. I feel right at home. ;)

The village where they live consists of three houses pretty much in the middle of nowhere, yet we do have wireless, for which I am quite thankful. At the moment, I'm catching a breather and food is being put together. I hadn't eaten since breakfast in Penrith, except for a really lousy sandwich from the airport at Rennes. (Airport food machine food is pretty much the same everywhere). I just had to put something in my stomach before I exploded.

The village here is an hour or maybe 90 minutes from the airport at Rennes. Brittany looks different from the air than England did, but the tiny villages on narrow roads are very similar. More crucifixes about, but one might expect that from a nominally Catholic country. There's blue sky with a little light rain. I've asked about Carnac and the Merlin sites. We are situated near the forest of Broceliande (if I am spelling that properly), which is an exceedingly Arthurian place to be.

At the airport, passport check was slightly awkward. The guy in the booth barely spoke English and I barely spoke French, but we managed to work out that I was here on vacation for a few days and got my passport stamped. I won't really be near any cities except when I get off the train at Charles De Gaulle airport, and even then it will barely be in waving distance of Paris, so I will be getting a very rural experience here, as well. There are megalithic sites in my future! Rain or shine, I shall see them!

The train from Penrith went directly to the Manchester airport and was packed to the gills almost all the way. It was pretty much SRO until Manchester Piccadilly, the stop before the airport, whereupon the train was exited in a rush and nearly deserted for the last few minutes of the journey. It took about two hours start to finish, then I waited for several hours at the airport, but one really must be certain one doesn't miss one's flight!

The house here is very pretty but they said when they got back from Sweden recently, the WC had broken out all in mold. It's improved since they've cleaned and aired it, and the upstairs where the bedrooms are shouldn't be a problem at all, so I don't think I'll need too much in the way of antihistamines for the nights. I did take some tylenol because I could not figure out how to lean the airline seat back on the FlyBe plane. It was a prop plane, which I rather wasn't quite expecting -- I keep forgetting these are much shorter flights than I'm used to. I think it was about a 90 minute flight? As such, we got on and off the plane via stairs to the runway, which I haven't done since visiting my mom in Rapid City some years back.

And now I should probably go plug the iPad in so it will recharge after multiple games of Plants v Zombies on the plane... Later!
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Whitman: not all who wander)
I was picked up right on time by [livejournal.com profile] eydimork and her husband and have been thoroughly slobbered by their dog. I feel right at home. ;)

The village where they live consists of three houses pretty much in the middle of nowhere, yet we do have wireless, for which I am quite thankful. At the moment, I'm catching a breather and food is being put together. I hadn't eaten since breakfast in Penrith, except for a really lousy sandwich from the airport at Rennes. (Airport food machine food is pretty much the same everywhere). I just had to put something in my stomach before I exploded.

The village here is an hour or maybe 90 minutes from the airport at Rennes. Brittany looks different from the air than England did, but the tiny villages on narrow roads are very similar. More crucifixes about, but one might expect that from a nominally Catholic country. There's blue sky with a little light rain. I've asked about Carnac and the Merlin sites. We are situated near the forest of Broceliande (if I am spelling that properly), which is an exceedingly Arthurian place to be.

At the airport, passport check was slightly awkward. The guy in the booth barely spoke English and I barely spoke French, but we managed to work out that I was here on vacation for a few days and got my passport stamped. I won't really be near any cities except when I get off the train at Charles De Gaulle airport, and even then it will barely be in waving distance of Paris, so I will be getting a very rural experience here, as well. There are megalithic sites in my future! Rain or shine, I shall see them!

The train from Penrith went directly to the Manchester airport and was packed to the gills almost all the way. It was pretty much SRO until Manchester Piccadilly, the stop before the airport, whereupon the train was exited in a rush and nearly deserted for the last few minutes of the journey. It took about two hours start to finish, then I waited for several hours at the airport, but one really must be certain one doesn't miss one's flight!

The house here is very pretty but they said when they got back from Sweden recently, the WC had broken out all in mold. It's improved since they've cleaned and aired it, and the upstairs where the bedrooms are shouldn't be a problem at all, so I don't think I'll need too much in the way of antihistamines for the nights. I did take some tylenol because I could not figure out how to lean the airline seat back on the FlyBe plane. It was a prop plane, which I rather wasn't quite expecting -- I keep forgetting these are much shorter flights than I'm used to. I think it was about a 90 minute flight? As such, we got on and off the plane via stairs to the runway, which I haven't done since visiting my mom in Rapid City some years back.

And now I should probably go plug the iPad in so it will recharge after multiple games of Plants v Zombies on the plane... Later!
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Whitman: not all who wander)
It's time for me to bid England goodbye and head out to Brittany, and [livejournal.com profile] eydimork and her husband. I've had a lovely couple of days in Penrith, Potfest was pretty cool (there were a lot of things that were kind of 'meh' but quite a few that were really nice, as well), and Stephen and Peter were absolutely delightful.

I went to bed early last night -- in the 9:30ish range -- because my legs were kind of a mess after walking back from the venue into town. There were crosswalks at the roundabout, but no clear sidewalks, so I wasn't sure where I was supposed to be going and got a bit lost on what were some fairly dangerous main roads, but all went well and I was fine, if creaky.

Dinner last night was Indian again and, just as in Ireland, it was much sweeter than I'm used to at home. The eggplant was nice and savory, but the butter chicken was a lot sweeter than I'd expected. I was asked if I'd yet had any vindaloo, in honor of Red Dwarf, but I think I'm going to have to pass, unless they have some at the Manchester airport. ;)

Everyone has been absolutely wonderful here, and so very kind to me. I feel so incredibly blessed to have such fantastic friends, and I hope that we'll be able to meet again someday. Unless I end up doing another pilgrimage with the Sisterhood of Avalon, the odds are rather low, I will admit, but I live in hope. [livejournal.com profile] fififolle, [livejournal.com profile] hagazusa, and their families were great and very welcoming. It's been a pleasure to visit, and I hope you folks know that you're more than welcome to come and stay with me if you like, if you're ever in the Seattle area. I may not be in town, but it's not really that far to get into Seattle from my place.

My train is out of here at 8:45 this morning, direct to Manchester Airport, where I fly into Rennes. I'm so looking forward to meeting [livejournal.com profile] eydimork this afternoon! (And French food. And Carnac. And Merln sites. And the Festival Interceltique.) So much more cool stuff to come on this journey.

See you soon!
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Whitman: not all who wander)
It's time for me to bid England goodbye and head out to Brittany, and [livejournal.com profile] eydimork and her husband. I've had a lovely couple of days in Penrith, Potfest was pretty cool (there were a lot of things that were kind of 'meh' but quite a few that were really nice, as well), and Stephen and Peter were absolutely delightful.

I went to bed early last night -- in the 9:30ish range -- because my legs were kind of a mess after walking back from the venue into town. There were crosswalks at the roundabout, but no clear sidewalks, so I wasn't sure where I was supposed to be going and got a bit lost on what were some fairly dangerous main roads, but all went well and I was fine, if creaky.

Dinner last night was Indian again and, just as in Ireland, it was much sweeter than I'm used to at home. The eggplant was nice and savory, but the butter chicken was a lot sweeter than I'd expected. I was asked if I'd yet had any vindaloo, in honor of Red Dwarf, but I think I'm going to have to pass, unless they have some at the Manchester airport. ;)

Everyone has been absolutely wonderful here, and so very kind to me. I feel so incredibly blessed to have such fantastic friends, and I hope that we'll be able to meet again someday. Unless I end up doing another pilgrimage with the Sisterhood of Avalon, the odds are rather low, I will admit, but I live in hope. [livejournal.com profile] fififolle, [livejournal.com profile] hagazusa, and their families were great and very welcoming. It's been a pleasure to visit, and I hope you folks know that you're more than welcome to come and stay with me if you like, if you're ever in the Seattle area. I may not be in town, but it's not really that far to get into Seattle from my place.

My train is out of here at 8:45 this morning, direct to Manchester Airport, where I fly into Rennes. I'm so looking forward to meeting [livejournal.com profile] eydimork this afternoon! (And French food. And Carnac. And Merln sites. And the Festival Interceltique.) So much more cool stuff to come on this journey.

See you soon!
erynn: Gaelic merman image (GONZO!)
A nice comfy bed, a pillow, and actual walls around me were very helpful with that sleep thingummy. In other words, I spent a restful night at Chez [livejournal.com profile] hagazusa after some tasty tomato soup, some bread, and a lovely bit of mildly sharp cheddar. [livejournal.com profile] fififolle has been contacted with arrangements for swooping in and taking me away. It's raining off and on today again, but there shall be a voyage out to see the pwny Miss Boo (rest assured, photos will be taken), rain or shine.

I'm still exceedingly creaky but doing a little better. At least a few brain cells have been restored. The keyboards here have things in different places than I'm used to. Once I'm done with this, there will be bits of scribbling in my pilgrimage journal.

As it happens, I am in the land of the Brigantes, so I am once again in Brigid territory, if you will. She and Manannan (whose namesake ferry I made the crossing in, from Isle of Man to Liverpool) have been showing up regularly. Once I get to Brittany, I will be firmly in Merlin territory, and [livejournal.com profile] eydimork says that they have some alternate Merlin stories about what happened to him in that cave and all that. I shall be most interested to hear the local Merlin lore and see the sights, as well as attend the Festival Interceltique in Lorient. I believe Breesha will be there as well, from what she said when we met last week.

I've been having a fine time despite yesterday's utter brain death. Looking forward to the day's adventures!
erynn: Gaelic merman image (GONZO!)
A nice comfy bed, a pillow, and actual walls around me were very helpful with that sleep thingummy. In other words, I spent a restful night at Chez [livejournal.com profile] hagazusa after some tasty tomato soup, some bread, and a lovely bit of mildly sharp cheddar. [livejournal.com profile] fififolle has been contacted with arrangements for swooping in and taking me away. It's raining off and on today again, but there shall be a voyage out to see the pwny Miss Boo (rest assured, photos will be taken), rain or shine.

I'm still exceedingly creaky but doing a little better. At least a few brain cells have been restored. The keyboards here have things in different places than I'm used to. Once I'm done with this, there will be bits of scribbling in my pilgrimage journal.

As it happens, I am in the land of the Brigantes, so I am once again in Brigid territory, if you will. She and Manannan (whose namesake ferry I made the crossing in, from Isle of Man to Liverpool) have been showing up regularly. Once I get to Brittany, I will be firmly in Merlin territory, and [livejournal.com profile] eydimork says that they have some alternate Merlin stories about what happened to him in that cave and all that. I shall be most interested to hear the local Merlin lore and see the sights, as well as attend the Festival Interceltique in Lorient. I believe Breesha will be there as well, from what she said when we met last week.

I've been having a fine time despite yesterday's utter brain death. Looking forward to the day's adventures!

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