erynn: Gaelic merman image (lotus)
When I got down to Seattle Center today, I swooped in and snagged [livejournal.com profile] nancyblue for lunch. We found ourselves at a Brazillian restaurant at the place that used to be Cafe Minnie at 1st and Denny, and I showed her the photos I'd taken last night of the Golden Section Order papers that I had. She'd seen newsletters from Ithel Colquhoun's collection in the UK last time she was there, but hadn't seen any of the documents I have, so we talked about that for a while.

When we got back to the conference, I found [livejournal.com profile] meddevi, who was there to look at the art and the books. I picked up a few more books that I'd been interested in, including a catalogue of an Austin Osman Spare exhibition from 2010, along with a dvd of his work and life that comes with the volume. I'm very much looking forward to looking through it and watching the dvd. While perusing the books section, I spoke for a while with the folks from the School of Spagyric & Alchemical Arts, who were offering tiny samples of some of their spagyric work with rose, gold, amber, and gold/frankincense/myrrh, all of which were very nice stuff. By the end of the day, Taylor had sold all the copies of both of my books that he'd brought with him, which pleased all of us. He said he would probably have been able to sell a few more of them pretty easily.

I talked to Taylor about the essays and articles I have in the various Immanion anthologies and he said that yes, the contracts have all specified that all authors maintain all rights over their work, and that if I wanted to publish them in an anthology of my own work, they were fine with that. So I need to check with a couple of other publishers to make sure that it would be okay to reprint those, as well, and I might be able to get a collection published of the material I have scattered in a dozen books so that folks can get everything in one volume. That, I might take to Immanion for publication as well -- I haven't thought too much about a publisher yet.

I got the new grimoire from [livejournal.com profile] aion131 today and am looking at getting one of the ceramics pieces he exhibited at the conference this year. He's taking them over to Gargoyles next. While I was talking with Craig I realized that I might be able to get some of my photos from Prague and Kuntá Hora into Gargoyles as an exhibit and maybe sell some prints of them if any of them are good enough. I was given an old photograph/art printer a few years back and a bunch of photographic print paper, so all I need is someone to help me get things set up and make sure I have the proper ink cartridges for things, and to make sure that some of these things are of good enough quality to actually do this. A few of the photos from the Sedlec Ossuary would need to be slightly cropped to get bits of living people out of them, but I do have some pretty cool stuff and it would be right up Gargoyles' gothy alley. As would the gargoyle photos from St Vitus's Cathedral at Prague Castle.

The after-party was fun, and the Queen Anne Masonic Lodge was decked out like a swanky goth club for the evening with a pretty spiffy open bar. There were some excellent conversations at the party before I headed home again with [livejournal.com profile] alfrecht, who will be heading back to Anacortes tomorrow morning.

For me, the next few days are going to be trying to catch up on a little sleep and poking at the fic I'm writing. Once that's done, I'll take a breath and start outlining some of the Brigid book.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Mercurius from Harmonia Macrocosmica)
We spent so much time at Prague Castle (the "short" tour of only four of the locations) that we didn't get to the alchemy museum today. It won't happen because we just don't have enough time in town, but I can't in the least even imply that I missed anything by missing it, because I could have spent hours more at the castle. My feet hurt like crazy, but it was so very worth it. I took a ton of photos and hope that some of them come out. The lighting in places was at angles that made it nearly impossible to get a proper shot of some things that I wanted. I do think I got some really good gargoyle photos from the outside of St Vitus's Cathedral.

We bought a ticket for the Old Royal Palace (couldn't take photos inside because we didn't realize we needed to pay another 50 Ckr for the privilege), St George's Bascilica, St Vitus's Cathedral, and Golden Lane (where Kafka once lived). My dear but somewhat jaded sib was pretty impressed by St Vitus's. I was just plain overwhelmed. There was so much there that it would be impossible to actually see everything in less than a week, if one has a sense of art in even one cell in their body.

For a bit it looked like it might rain, but it simply stayed overcast for a while. It was hot and stuffy inside the Old Royal Palace, but there wasn't much ventilation. The other areas were all much more moderate. We came in through the gardens at the Royal Summer Palace, which was being restored, and walked along the garden above the Orangery, entering via the bridge over the moat. This isn't one you can actually see water in - it's a ravine that probably had water in it at one point but now is apparently largely public gardens. The entry led us into a huge courtyard, but we stopped immediately to buy tickets for the short tour. Four of the seven sites you have to pay to enter are on that ticket.

A lot of the buildings were in various states of restoration, both inside and out, but it was all just incredible to see. Everything from the medieval to the modern could be found there. The cathedral has a glass window painted by Mucha amid the huge collection of stained glass. St George's Bascilica feels a lot older and more simple inside (I haven't looked at dates and all), but is still quite impressive in its own way. I'm finding myself at a loss for words to describe all this and only hope that my photos will do it some small justice.

By the time we got out of there, it was about 4:30pm, and we weren't sure of the actual location of the alchemy museum (insufficient research had been done the night before) and figured by the time we found it (assuming we could with minimal information and lack of net access) it would likely be closed anyway. And besides, my feet hurt way too much to walk very much further.

This morning, we got a lovely start. The sib met us here and we had breakfast at the Cukarna Alchymista, a little cafe down the street from [livejournal.com profile] tdancinghands's place. They have the most spiffy tea and coffee cups ever, and I've bought a lovely cup and saucer from them, while the sib got two little espresso cups with their saucers. I'll have photos of the one I got sometime soon. The cafe had its own little central courtyard garden and came equipped with a black cat strolling about; he probably owned the place.

Plans have been made for tomorrow. I'm too tired to really write more right now. Not only did I have an immensely long day on my feet, but I woke up this morning at 4:30am and was completely unable to get back to sleep. I'm hoping I'll sleep okay tonight. Tomorrow we'll be out of here at about 10am for Kutna Hora, a small town outside of Prague famous for its silver mine and its alchemical connections.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Mercurius from Harmonia Macrocosmica)
We spent so much time at Prague Castle (the "short" tour of only four of the locations) that we didn't get to the alchemy museum today. It won't happen because we just don't have enough time in town, but I can't in the least even imply that I missed anything by missing it, because I could have spent hours more at the castle. My feet hurt like crazy, but it was so very worth it. I took a ton of photos and hope that some of them come out. The lighting in places was at angles that made it nearly impossible to get a proper shot of some things that I wanted. I do think I got some really good gargoyle photos from the outside of St Vitus's Cathedral.

We bought a ticket for the Old Royal Palace (couldn't take photos inside because we didn't realize we needed to pay another 50 Ckr for the privilege), St George's Bascilica, St Vitus's Cathedral, and Golden Lane (where Kafka once lived). My dear but somewhat jaded sib was pretty impressed by St Vitus's. I was just plain overwhelmed. There was so much there that it would be impossible to actually see everything in less than a week, if one has a sense of art in even one cell in their body.

For a bit it looked like it might rain, but it simply stayed overcast for a while. It was hot and stuffy inside the Old Royal Palace, but there wasn't much ventilation. The other areas were all much more moderate. We came in through the gardens at the Royal Summer Palace, which was being restored, and walked along the garden above the Orangery, entering via the bridge over the moat. This isn't one you can actually see water in - it's a ravine that probably had water in it at one point but now is apparently largely public gardens. The entry led us into a huge courtyard, but we stopped immediately to buy tickets for the short tour. Four of the seven sites you have to pay to enter are on that ticket.

A lot of the buildings were in various states of restoration, both inside and out, but it was all just incredible to see. Everything from the medieval to the modern could be found there. The cathedral has a glass window painted by Mucha amid the huge collection of stained glass. St George's Bascilica feels a lot older and more simple inside (I haven't looked at dates and all), but is still quite impressive in its own way. I'm finding myself at a loss for words to describe all this and only hope that my photos will do it some small justice.

By the time we got out of there, it was about 4:30pm, and we weren't sure of the actual location of the alchemy museum (insufficient research had been done the night before) and figured by the time we found it (assuming we could with minimal information and lack of net access) it would likely be closed anyway. And besides, my feet hurt way too much to walk very much further.

This morning, we got a lovely start. The sib met us here and we had breakfast at the Cukarna Alchymista, a little cafe down the street from [livejournal.com profile] tdancinghands's place. They have the most spiffy tea and coffee cups ever, and I've bought a lovely cup and saucer from them, while the sib got two little espresso cups with their saucers. I'll have photos of the one I got sometime soon. The cafe had its own little central courtyard garden and came equipped with a black cat strolling about; he probably owned the place.

Plans have been made for tomorrow. I'm too tired to really write more right now. Not only did I have an immensely long day on my feet, but I woke up this morning at 4:30am and was completely unable to get back to sleep. I'm hoping I'll sleep okay tonight. Tomorrow we'll be out of here at about 10am for Kutna Hora, a small town outside of Prague famous for its silver mine and its alchemical connections.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (lynx at first glance)
I want to try to list some of the things we did today while I can still remember the bits. There was an awful lot. I took photos inside one of the churches/cathedrals there, which was open for photos unless a service was in progress. We walked along Wenceslas Square when we came out of the underground. Walking along that way, we went to the Franciscan Gardens. There was a passage where we saw a very cool stained glass tribute to Tesla radio. From there we went into the Old Town Square and saw the astronomical clock and an immense amount of amazing architecture. I wish I could list all the cool stuff we saw, but I don't even know what most of it was. At the edge of the Old Town Square was Kafka Square, where we got a little lunch of good food for a pretty reasonable price. I had half a roast duck, some yummy garlic soup, and some of the wheat dumplings (as opposed to potato ones) with gravy. It was really tasty. The sib and I picked up little touristy replicas of the face of the astronomical clock. I think they're actual clocks you can hang on the wall (the extra touristy bit is that they say "Prague" on them). I got a little ceramic plate as well. Probably the most touristy things I've got on this whole excursion so far, even counting the two t-shirts.

After lunch we cruised down some narrow cobblestone streets, most of which were pedestrian-only. Eventually we came to the Charles Bridge and I took a whole bunch of photos there. That took quite a while, and it was bright, sunny, and hot today, so I was pretty pleased except for the glare in my eyes. Descending from the Charles Bridge back into the city, we wandered along some more narrow cobbled streets, looked into an English language bookshop (not much of interest, though it did have a section of Czech-interest stuff in English), and then sat and had a little something cool to drink in the courtyard of the Kafka Museum.

We walked to the garden in the grounds of the Czech senate, which has a really weird fake cave wall up against one wall, in which they also keep a collection of owls. Pretty odd stuff. By that time, exhaustion had pretty much caught up with most of us.

After dropping the sib at the trolley, we headed back to chez [livejournal.com profile] tdancinghands, where we caught a little rest and I previously posted. About 7pm, we walked over to the Nad Kralovskou oborou, which is a game restaurant, where we indulged in Czech versions of different wild meat. I had the wild roast boar with a rose-hip sauce, which was absolutely excellent. Once done with dinner, we walked across the street to the old king's hunting grounds, which the restaurant is named after. We walked down to the hunting lodge (not what you are imagining from the US, as in "small cabin in the woods." I got a few photos of the lodge in the sunset, and of some kind of spherical sundial or sight of some sort, marked with astrological engravings. I'm going to have to try to figure out what that was.

Tomorrow will be Prague Castle, the Jewish quarter, and the alchemy museum.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (lynx at first glance)
I want to try to list some of the things we did today while I can still remember the bits. There was an awful lot. I took photos inside one of the churches/cathedrals there, which was open for photos unless a service was in progress. We walked along Wenceslas Square when we came out of the underground. Walking along that way, we went to the Franciscan Gardens. There was a passage where we saw a very cool stained glass tribute to Tesla radio. From there we went into the Old Town Square and saw the astronomical clock and an immense amount of amazing architecture. I wish I could list all the cool stuff we saw, but I don't even know what most of it was. At the edge of the Old Town Square was Kafka Square, where we got a little lunch of good food for a pretty reasonable price. I had half a roast duck, some yummy garlic soup, and some of the wheat dumplings (as opposed to potato ones) with gravy. It was really tasty. The sib and I picked up little touristy replicas of the face of the astronomical clock. I think they're actual clocks you can hang on the wall (the extra touristy bit is that they say "Prague" on them). I got a little ceramic plate as well. Probably the most touristy things I've got on this whole excursion so far, even counting the two t-shirts.

After lunch we cruised down some narrow cobblestone streets, most of which were pedestrian-only. Eventually we came to the Charles Bridge and I took a whole bunch of photos there. That took quite a while, and it was bright, sunny, and hot today, so I was pretty pleased except for the glare in my eyes. Descending from the Charles Bridge back into the city, we wandered along some more narrow cobbled streets, looked into an English language bookshop (not much of interest, though it did have a section of Czech-interest stuff in English), and then sat and had a little something cool to drink in the courtyard of the Kafka Museum.

We walked to the garden in the grounds of the Czech senate, which has a really weird fake cave wall up against one wall, in which they also keep a collection of owls. Pretty odd stuff. By that time, exhaustion had pretty much caught up with most of us.

After dropping the sib at the trolley, we headed back to chez [livejournal.com profile] tdancinghands, where we caught a little rest and I previously posted. About 7pm, we walked over to the Nad Kralovskou oborou, which is a game restaurant, where we indulged in Czech versions of different wild meat. I had the wild roast boar with a rose-hip sauce, which was absolutely excellent. Once done with dinner, we walked across the street to the old king's hunting grounds, which the restaurant is named after. We walked down to the hunting lodge (not what you are imagining from the US, as in "small cabin in the woods." I got a few photos of the lodge in the sunset, and of some kind of spherical sundial or sight of some sort, marked with astrological engravings. I'm going to have to try to figure out what that was.

Tomorrow will be Prague Castle, the Jewish quarter, and the alchemy museum.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (writy medievalist)
Today was re-checking the contact information and writing the last of the ogam meditations, which I sent off this morning after sopping up a cuppa tea and getting my brain more or less in gear. I fretted and worried, then went over to Freddie's and picked up a pair of earphones for my phone/iPod that have the little hooks that go over your ears, as the ones that come with the iPod keep slipping out and feel weird. Earphones seem to be the thing I lose the most. I buy them and never seem to find them again. These are bright blue. That should help keep them located, at least.

After my walk down to Freddie's and back. [livejournal.com profile] gra_is_stor and I walked around the lake. We watched some eps of BBC Sherlock (including the final ep of season two, so I have now seen the cliffie). I did a little eye-averting at a couple of strategic spots, but it was still a little creepy for me. Of course, it's a crime drama/mystery series, so one expects that. The only real mystery here was how he pulled it off, of course, and we all know he'll show up again in the first ep of season three.

I wrote up a post for my Searching for Imbas blog about the pilgrimage and responded to some emails. It looks like we have a room for PantheaCon, thanks to [livejournal.com profile] lwood. I did a little research on places to go in Prague with the sib and sent him some links on Prague and alchemy and on the alchemy museum there, which sounds like it will be fun, particularly since he's a lab alchemist. It should be a good afternoon's visit, at the very least.

I did some laundry and tomorrow will be my last check over the carry-on to see if I need anything or have left anything out.

My nerves are a little rattled, but they usually are before something big, so that's not at all unusual.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (writy medievalist)
Today was re-checking the contact information and writing the last of the ogam meditations, which I sent off this morning after sopping up a cuppa tea and getting my brain more or less in gear. I fretted and worried, then went over to Freddie's and picked up a pair of earphones for my phone/iPod that have the little hooks that go over your ears, as the ones that come with the iPod keep slipping out and feel weird. Earphones seem to be the thing I lose the most. I buy them and never seem to find them again. These are bright blue. That should help keep them located, at least.

After my walk down to Freddie's and back. [livejournal.com profile] gra_is_stor and I walked around the lake. We watched some eps of BBC Sherlock (including the final ep of season two, so I have now seen the cliffie). I did a little eye-averting at a couple of strategic spots, but it was still a little creepy for me. Of course, it's a crime drama/mystery series, so one expects that. The only real mystery here was how he pulled it off, of course, and we all know he'll show up again in the first ep of season three.

I wrote up a post for my Searching for Imbas blog about the pilgrimage and responded to some emails. It looks like we have a room for PantheaCon, thanks to [livejournal.com profile] lwood. I did a little research on places to go in Prague with the sib and sent him some links on Prague and alchemy and on the alchemy museum there, which sounds like it will be fun, particularly since he's a lab alchemist. It should be a good afternoon's visit, at the very least.

I did some laundry and tomorrow will be my last check over the carry-on to see if I need anything or have left anything out.

My nerves are a little rattled, but they usually are before something big, so that's not at all unusual.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (05 nin)
Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition Conference 2012

July 14-15, Milwaukee, WI

Call for Abstracts:

Since 2001, the Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition (JWMT) has worked to publish diverse perspectives on the occultisms, magical practices, mysticisms and esotericisms commonly known as the “Western Mystery Tradition.” The JWMT is expanding the work of the web journal through its first conference.

The JWMT conference is a two-day event open to scholars, students, practitioners, and the public. The keynote speaker is the Journal’s founder and publisher, Dr. Jeffrey S. Kupperman.

The study of western esoteric practices has risen greatly over the last decade, focusing on Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Modern magical practices and beliefs, outside of the realm of modern Paganisms and the New Age, have received little attention. Further, practitioners have had little opportunity to present their work, either as papers or in the form of ritual practice, outside of the internet or small groups. The focus of this conference is the movement of contemporary western esotericisms, loosely construed as the “western mysteries,” and their transition from the 20th to the 21st century. The Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition Conference 2012 is seeking abstracts for presentations, panels and practices centered on this broad subject.
Topics may include, but are not limited to:

Esoteric traditions such as Freemasonry, Rosicrucianism, Martinism and chivalric organizations,

Ritual magical practices from organizations such as the Golden Dawn and the Aurum Solis and modern initiatory Paganisms,

Esotericisms from earlier periods, such as alchemy, Gnosticism and Neoplatonism, the magical work of John Dee or the medieval grimoire traditions, and their re-emergence and relevancy to modern praxes,

Theoretical, paedogogical, and methodological approaches to the study of the western mysteries,

The relation of the esotericisms to orthodox and mainstream practices and society at large.

We welcome presentations, panels and practices focusing on methodological and theoretical issues in relation to the contemporary study and practice of the various western esoteric currents. The conference encourages an interdisciplinary approach and welcomes perspectives from the disciplines of religious studies, theology, anthropology, sociology, psychology, philosophy, history, political science, as well as active practitioners. Papers should last 20 minutes, with time for questions and answers. Panels and practices will be scheduled for up to an hour, with time for questions and answers afterwards as necessary.

Please submit abstracts (approx. 200 words), proposals for a themed panel (with three presenters, moderator as necessary, and short description) or proposals for a ritual practice and discussion to conference@jwmt.org. Deadline for submissions is April 15, 2012.

No attachments please; copy and paste your abstract or proposal in plain text into the body of the e-mail. Submissions are not limited to academics or professional scholars. Include a brief (no more than one page) CV listing any qualifications, academic or otherwise, relevant to your proposal.

The conference will be held at the Best Western Plus Milwaukee Airport Hotel and Conference Center. More information on the conference, registration, fees, accommodation, etc. is available at http://www.jwmt.org/jwmt12.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (angry tiger)
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=370462019062&ru=http%3A%2F%2Fshop.ebay.com%3A80%2F%3F_from%3DR40&_trksid=p5038.m570.l1313&_nkw=370462019062&_sacat=See-All-Categories&_fvi=1&_rdc=1#ht_21822wt_1139

OCCULT KABBALAH TAROT WICCA MASONIC GNOSTIC HERMETIC - eBay (item 370462019062 end time Dec-05-10 17:10:26 PST)

If you are an author or ever contributed to the PODSNet BBS system or had something included in the "Riders of the Crystal Well BOS", aka the PODSNet BOS, aka "the Internet BOS" you should check to see if your work is included, and if it is, file your DCMA takedown requests.

Many of the books in this collection are currently in-print works of living authors. Please pass the word far and wide and get this removed from Ebay and other possible websites.
erynn: Gaelic merman image (spubba's chibi!Erynn)
Went out this evening for a concert at Cornish that [livejournal.com profile] alfrecht wanted to go to. One of his friends from mah jong had composed a piece to be performed as a part of a student exhibition. We went and had a good time (and the piece we went to hear was actually quite good, unlike some of the others we heard tonight) and then dragged N out for dinner/dessert at the B&O afterwards. What N had failed to mention is that he's also part of a gamelan performance tomorrow at 5:30, so since I'm going to be in Seattle anyway, we'll go for that too.

Mom sent some emails from my brother in Italy. He's actually TDY in England right now. One of the things he was asking me last time he emailed me (quite some time ago now) was about alchemy. It appears that not only is he interested in alchemy, but he considers himself a devotee of Thoth. I need to point him toward Neos Alexandria, I think. I'm checking with mom to be sure I have the right email addy for him. He's apparently been having some difficulty with the fundies on base, but given the military these days, that's not unexpected.

He plans on staying in Italy when he retires. He really loves it there, and I do want to get over and visit him at some point. I keep saying "next year" but maybe it'll be for real this time, who knows?
erynn: Gaelic merman image (xanphibian's all your books!)
Another book that I read on my road trip (in fact, while I was on the road to and at Burning Man this year) was Inner Alchemy )
erynn: Gaelic merman image (Oracle at Seattle byYuki_Onna)
In this case, just a couple of them. One on alchemy, and one on the number zero. You can read what I thought about them here. )
erynn: Gaelic merman image (xanphibian's all your books!)
I picked this book up the other day and finished it in a fairly short session. For such a slender volume, it has a lot of good and interesting material. The book is essentially about the production of planetary elixirs from plants, and discusses the planetary vibrations and their uses with a minimum of jargon and esoteric woo. His instructions for actual extraction are basic, offering a number of options of varying levels of complexity, and his discussion of the magical operations also allow for different beliefs and systems, though his personal basis is in Qabala and Tantrism.

While I disagree with a few of his opinions (his numerological assignments regarding a few of the planets, for instance), his magical technique is sound and easily adaptable to any system, Pagan or non-theistic. This is the revised 2001 edition. The original was published in 1977 and is regarded as a classic in the field. Despite its size, this book provides a lot of food for thought and doesn't dwell overmuch on theoretical esotericism. It's a very practical guide to what can be an extremely complex art.

Four and a half alembics out of five.

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